11/22/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #82: 3x5x10+ Wordbank 13


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#82
3x5x10+ Wordbank 13
For today's writing exercise complete the following steps.

1) Pick one word from each of three groups and write a sentence that includes all of the words, feel free to change tense, pluralize, gerund etc. 
2) Repeat the process ten (10) times using different combinations. No dawdling!
3) Now write five (5) sentences that are five words or fewer in length that use any two (2) words.
4) Now write three (3) sentences that use four or more of the words.
5) Now write a piece of fiction or poetry that uses at least three (3) of those sentences. Try to use as many of the (good) sentences as you can, or parts of the sentences if the whole thing doesn't fit or works better altered.


Word Bank 1:
  • Yellowed
  • Wary
  • Rotten
  • Limp
  • Dingo
Wordbank 2:
  • Elephant
  • Kid
  • Flit
  • Err
  • Drawstring
Wordbank 3:
  • Oak
  • Pit
  • Wrongly
  • Elsewhere
  • Lockstep

Bonus writing exercise: Include in your story or poem a sentence which begins with the letter A and ends with the word "Topaz", and must mention some sort of drink by specific brand or type of drink.
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Want some unobtrusive background writing music? Try Terry Riley's minimalist 1982 album Descending Moonshine Dervishes.















11/21/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #81: Ekphrastic Forest


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#81
Ekphrastic Forest


F
or today, we're going to write a poem or prose piece inspired by another piece of art or an ekphrastic piece. The piece of art in question is this photo by Reddit user  MuonicDecay


If nothing right off strikes you try the following exercises along with the image.
  1. Tell the story of the planting of this forest from the perspective of a teacher chaperone. At some point envision this image, but also having their hands full trying to keep the rambunctious kids in line.
  2. Write a narrative from the perspective of one of the tree planting fifth grade class of 1994 about returning to this forest as an adult. Do you walk through it, or is the change too much, resulting in 'you' only getting to the parking lot then leaving.
  3. Write a piece in which this picture is taken shortly before a forest fire, and ruminate on the destruction of that forest and the passing of time transmogrifying the children into adults.
  4. Write a piece in which a child runs by this sign into the forest for some reason—whether chased, exploring, playing a game, whatever you want. But he runs by the sign and catches a glimpse of it.

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If you'd like background writing music try the album Love for Chet by Stéphane Belmondo.






11/20/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #80: Beginning & Ending with Falling Snow 12


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
#80

Beginning & Ending with Falling Snow 12
For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which begins with one image, scenario, line of dialog or place and ends with another, and an optional additional requirement.


Begin WithA snowball breaking a window.

End WithA Christmas wreath covered in snow.


Extra Credit RequirementsInclude the description of something that squeaks; and the words: "Nutmeg" "Hearth" "Gouge" and "Plasma".


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If you'd like some background music, try Stravinsky's "The Firebird" as performed by the Vienna Philharmonic.






11/19/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #79 Title Mania Plus Galapagos 12


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
#79
Title Mania Plus Galapagos 12

For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which uses one of the following as its title. For a bonus challenge use the additional exercise of five random constraints.


Titles:
  1. Bits of Plant Particulate
  2. Mulch
  3. Diving the Dumpsters
  4. Tickled to Death
  5. Under a Classic Car in Santa Clara as the Sun Sets Behind an Iced Tea Slowly Dripping Condensation

Bonus Exercise: 5 Random Constraints
(I recommend picking any required words or lines before writing with a little surplus for options, but with your chosen title in mind)
  1. Your first paragraph must include the description of a car part using a simile.
  2. You must include at least six words which begin with the letter combination "Br".
  3. You must include one sentence (or at least 4 consecutive words) from the lyrics to the song "Galapagos (For the Fish)" by Ceschi Ramos.
  4. You must include two pairs of homophones in the same paragraph (4 words).
  5. Your piece must include two foods, one that is served cold and one that is served hot.

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If you'd like some background music to write to, try "Valtari" by Sigur Rós.








11/18/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #78 Three Things and a Random Title 06


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#78
Three Things and a Random Title 06
For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which contains the following three things, using a title generated by the random title generator linked below. Nice and simple. If you're not intimately familiar with these things do a little reading and see if a piece of info sticks out.



Title:
 Use this title generator. Get a look at the 3 things below that you must use and generate phrases 10 at a time. Try the more button on the generator no more than three times. If you click it a third time, that's it. Pick one of those. This is one of the best title generators I've found. "Sudden Exit" is one I got which could be about Indiana Jones Jr. stealing a relic from a high security skyscraper being related to a toddler's heist of a strawberry from the countertop—as an example.

  1. Indiana Jones
  2. A Strawberry
  3. Taipei 101 



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If you'd like some background music to write to, try Thievery Corporation's album, Saudade.






Fall Writing Exercise Series #77: Running Repetition


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#77
Running Repetition

For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which contains the following phrase at least four times (non-sequentially):

"Run for your life."

    This could be a very serious, literal running for your life, it could be the exact opposite where the phrase is hyperbolic and there is no danger at all. Maybe it's a command that the narrator gives to animals he's hunting or NPCs in a video game. Maybe it's a meditation on the Boston Marathon bombing (if so, do it in good taste, or, I'd advise that at least). Or do something completely different. Just be sure that the repeated phrase earns its worth in your piece. It should be necessary.

    Bonus Exercise: Also include Someone with a _____ the _____ nickname with the second part being an animal (like, Nicky the Bull, Stan the Snake etc), and include the words "Tape" "Frigid" "Tender" and "Pillar".
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    If you'd like some background music to write to, try indie hip hop producer RJD2's album More Is Than Isn't.
















    11/16/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #76: Six Word Shootout with Earl 10


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

    #76
    Six Word Shootout with Earl 10

    For today's writing exercise write a piece that includes the following six words. While it perfectly sets you up for a sestina, feel free to write whatever you'd like (but ya know, give that sestina a shot!). Also feel free to make slight alterations to the required words if you want to avoid that eye-pokey repetition you can find in sestinas sometimes.

    Required Words: Try, Banana, Wheels, Wait, Gas, Due

    Bonus Exercise: Use at least four words which end with "try" and include a kitchen table in your piece somewhere. 
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    If you'd like some background music to write to, try Hines '65 by Earl Hines.


















    11/15/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #75: 3x5x10+ Wordbank 12


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.


    #75
    3x5x10+ Wordbank 12
    For today's writing exercise complete the following steps.

    1) Pick one word from each of three groups and write a sentence that includes all of the words, feel free to change tense, pluralize, gerund etc. 
    2) Repeat the process ten (10) times using different combinations. No dawdling!
    3) Now write five (5) sentences that are five words or fewer in length that use any two (2) words.
    4) Now write three (3) sentences that use four or more of the words.
    5) Now write a piece of fiction or poetry that uses at least three (3) of those sentences. Try to use as many of the (good) sentences as you can, or parts of the sentences if the whole thing doesn't fit or works better altered.


    Word Bank 1:
    • Circus
    • Grumble
    • Implant
    • Fritter
    • Worm
    Wordbank 2:
    • Popover
    • Down
    • Grown
    • Repetitious
    • Branch
    Wordbank 3:
    • Wren
    • Playground
    • Triceratops
    • Rascal
    • Trellis

    Bonus writing exercise: Include in your story or poem a description of something smaller than a bread basket (or, say a small ice chest/cooler) using at least one aspect of something much larger (The Yorkie's tail swung like a ship's boom).
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    Want some unobtrusive background writing music? In honor of Bill Taylor's recent impeachment testimonty, try James Taylor's Greatest Hits.















    11/14/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #74: Beginning & Ending with Flying Cupcakes 11


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
    #74

    Beginning & Ending with Flying Cupcakes 11
    For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which begins with one image, scenario, line of dialog or place and ends with another, and an optional additional requirement.



    Begin WithA cupcake flying through the air.

    End WithA frog (or toad) sitting on a mailbox.


    Extra Credit RequirementsInclude the description of something that squeaks; and the words: "Froth" "Renewed" "Cusp" and "Parch".


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    If you'd like some background music, try Dvořák's Cello Concerto played by Jacqueline du Pré and the London Symphony Orchestra.





    11/13/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #73: Erasing The Crystal Egg 12


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

    #73
    Erasing The Crystal Egg 12

    For today's exercise we have split paths for fiction and poetry, though I highly recommend that even fiction writers try the poetry exercise.

    If you insist on fiction, write a piece titled either "The Hands of a Bric-a-Brac Collector" "Bursts of Zeal" or "At Some Remote Date".

    For poetry do an erasure or black-out poem from the following selection of H.G. Wells' short story "The Crystal Egg". An Erasure/Blackout is really simple: you take the given text and remove many words to make it your own new piece. One way to go about the erasure that I like to do is to copy the text and paste it twice into your document before you start erasing or blacking out (in MS Word set the text background color to black), that way if you get further into the erasure and decide you want a somewhat different tone or direction, it's easy to go to the unaltered version and make the erasure/black-out piece smoother. Another tip is to look for recurring words, in this example Cave and crystal both occur many times and could be good touchstones for your piece.

    Today's excerpt is a little short so keep that in mind\ when composing your erasure.

    Erasure Selection:

    from The Crystal Egg

    Mrs. Cave’s first impulse, directly Cave’s body had been taken upstairs, had been to write to the mad clergyman who had offered five pounds for the crystal, informing him of its recovery; but after a violent hunt, in which her daughter joined her, they were convinced of the loss of his address. As they were without the means required to mourn and bury Cave in the elaborate style the dignity of an old Seven Dials inhabitant demands, they had appealed to a friendly fellow-tradesman in Great Portland Street. He had very kindly taken over a portion of the stock at a valuation. The valuation was his own, and the crystal egg was included in one of the lots. Mr. Wace, after a few suitable condolences, a little off-handedly proffered perhaps, hurried at once to Great Portland Street. But there he learned that the crystal egg had already been sold to a tall, dark man in grey. And there the material facts in this curious, and to me at least very suggestive, story come abruptly to an end. The Great Portland Street dealer did not know who the tall dark man in grey was, nor had he observed him with sufficient attention to describe him minutely. He did not even know which way this person had gone after leaving the shop. For a time Mr. Wace remained in the shop, trying the dealer’s patience with hopeless questions, venting his own exasperation. And at last, realising abruptly that the whole thing had passed out of his hands, had vanished like a vision of the night, he returned to his own rooms, a little astonished to find the notes he had made still tangible and visible upon, his untidy table.

    His annoyance and disappointment were naturally very great. He made a second call (equally ineffectual) upon the Great Portland Street dealer, and he resorted to advertisements in such periodicals as were lively to come into the hands of a bric-a-brac collector. He also wrote letters to The Daily Chronicle and Nature, but both those periodicals, suspecting a hoax, asked him to reconsider his action before they printed, and he was advised that such a strange story, unfortunately so bare of supporting evidence, might imperil his reputation as an investigator. Moreover, the calls of his proper work were urgent. So that after a month or so, save for an occasional reminder to certain dealers, he had reluctantly to abandon the quest for the crystal egg, and from that day to this it remains undiscovered. Occasionally, however, he tells me, and I can quite believe him, he has bursts of zeal, in which he abandons his more urgent occupation and resumes the search.

    Whether or not it will remain lost for ever, with the material and origin of it, are things equally speculative at the present time. If the present purchaser is a collector, one would have expected the enquiries of Mr. Wace to have reached him through the dealers. He has been able to discover Mr. Cave’s clergyman and “Oriental”— no other than the Rev. James Parker and the young Prince of Bosso–Kuni in Java. I am obliged to them for certain particulars. The object of the Prince was simply curiosity — and extravagance. He was so eager to buy because Cave was so oddly reluctant to sell. It is just as possible that the buyer in the second instance was simply a casual purchaser and not a collector at all, and the crystal egg, for all I know, may at the present moment be within a mile of me, decorating a drawing-room or serving as a paper-weight — its remarkable functions all unknown. Indeed, it is partly with the idea of such a possibility that I have thrown this narrative into a form that will give it a chance of being read by the ordinary consumer of fiction.

    My own ideas in the matter are practically identical with those of Mr. Wace. I believe the crystal on the mast in Mars and the crystal egg of Mr. Cave’s to be in some physical, but at present quite inexplicable, way en rapport, and we both believe further that the terrestrial crystal must have been — possibly at some remote date — sent hither from that planet, in order to give the Martians a near view of our affairs. Possibly the fellows to the crystals on the other masts are also on our globe. No theory of hallucination suffices for the facts.

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    If you'd like some background music to write to, try the album Light: Music for the Marble Palace by minimalist legend Brian Eno.







    11/12/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #72 Title Mania Plus The Orb 11


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
    #72
    Title Mania Plus The Orb 11

    For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which uses one of the following as its title. For a bonus challenge use the additional exercise of five random constraints.


    Titles:
    1. Melted Butter, Flour and Sugar
    2. To the Moon and Back
    3. Hoosier
    4. Throttled
    5. Doorway to a Bad Day

    Bonus Exercise: 5 Random Constraints
    (I recommend picking any required words or lines before writing with a little surplus for options, but with your chosen title in mind)
    1. Your first paragraph must include the description of a pre-packaged food (Twinkie, TV dinner etc).
    2. You must include at least six words which begin with the letter combination "Bl".
    3. You must include one sentence (or at least 4 consecutive words) from the micro fiction "Compensation" by Ken Poyner which appears in the Cincinnati Review's miCRo series.
    4. You must include one flashback to exactly ten years previously.
    5. Your piece must include three sentences which are three words or fewer.

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    If you'd like some background music to write to, try "Metallic Spheres" by The Orb featuring David Gilmour.








    11/10/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #71 Three Things and a Random Title 05


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

    #71
    Three Things and a Random Title 05
    For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which contains the following three things, using a title generated by the random title generator linked below. Nice and simple. If you're not intimately familiar with these things do a little reading and see if a piece of info sticks out.


    Title:
     Use this title generator. Get a look at the 3 things below that you must use and generate phrases 10 at a time. Try the more button on the generator no more than three times. If you click it a third time, that's it. Pick one of those. This is one of the best title generators I've found. "An Undaunted Lady" is one I got when testing that I may have to try.

    1. A Dropkick
    2. A Giant Sequoia
    3. A Deserted (small) Airstrip 



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    If you'd like some background music to write to, try Philip Glass' album, Glassworks.




    11/9/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #70: Plate Repetition


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

    #70
    Plate Repetition

    For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which contains the following phrase at least four times (non-sequentially):

    "_______ stepped up to the plate"

      This is ready-made for your baseball piece, but a plate could be a serving dish, a type of armor, even a piece of bone. Maybe it's a small group of friends trying to identify a skeleton in the woods, or a suit of armor while on a museum field trip. Maybe it's a party with unappetizing looking hors d'oeuvres you feel you must sample out of politeness. Or do something completely different. Just be sure that the repeated phrase earns its worth in your piece. It should be necessary.

      Bonus Exercise: Also include two rhetorical questions, and include the words "Elk" "Elephant" "Flew" and "Weak".
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      If you'd like some background music to write to, try the Robert Rich album Vestiges.















      11/8/19

      Fall Writing Exercise Series #69: 3x5x10+ Wordbank 11


      The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

      These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.


      #69
      3x5x10+ Wordbank 11
      For today's writing exercise complete the following steps.

      1) Pick one word from each of three groups and write a sentence that includes all of the words, feel free to change tense, pluralize, gerund etc. 
      2) Repeat the process ten (10) times using different combinations. No dawdling!
      3) Now write five (5) sentences that are five words or fewer in length that use any two (2) words.
      4) Now write three (3) sentences that use four or more of the words.
      5) Now write a piece of fiction or poetry that uses at least three (3) of those sentences. Try to use as many of the (good) sentences as you can, or parts of the sentences if the whole thing doesn't fit or works better altered.


      Word Bank 1:
      • Conflate
      • Gamble
      • Imbue
      • Grit
      • Share
      Wordbank 2:
      • Pair
      • Intuition
      • Gut
      • Rope
      • Between
      Wordbank 3:
      • Rote
      • Plethora
      • Troop
      • Ripple
      • Trace

      Bonus writing exercise: Include in your story or poem a question which is answered with a simile, the simile's sentence beginning with "Like" (for instance, "Like a pig in mud").
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      Want some unobtrusive background writing music? Try the early (1967) electronic ambient album (and first electronic album commissioned by a record label) Silver Apples of the Moon by visionary musician Morton Subotnick.

















      11/7/19

      Fall Writing Exercise Series #68: Ekphrastic Tearing


      The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

      These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.


      #68
      Ekphrastic Tearing

      For today, we're going to write a poem or prose piece inspired by another piece of art or an ekphrastic piece. The piece of art in question is "Man and Nature" by Albania artist Agim Sulaj


      If nothing right off strikes you try the following exercises along with the image.
      1.  Tell the story of this man who tore a whole in the world. What did he do afterwards? Did he adventure into the unknown realm? Did he not and always wish he had? Did it seal back up or was it permanent? Much to explore.
      2. Write a narrative about the creation of this painting. Invent personal and social reasons and explore those in narrative form, using the painting of this image as the touchstone for the narrator.
      3. Write a piece specifically about deforestation and use "The Last Tree" as at least part of your title.
      4. While the scene is flat and empty as far as the eye can see, behind the 'camera' that is taking this image, there is a vast and abounding world. This was a planned event, but to what end? What is that other place? How did the tear actually occur and what are the motivations for making the tear?

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      If you'd like background writing music try the album Qui Sème Le Vent Récolte Le Tempo by French hip hop legend MC Solaar.





      11/6/19

      Fall Writing Exercise Series #67: Six Word Shootout with a Movie Star 09


      The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

      These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.


      #67
      Six Word Shootout with a Movie Star 09

      For today's writing exercise write a piece that includes the following six words. While it perfectly sets you up for a sestina, feel free to write whatever you'd like (but ya know, give that sestina a shot!). Also feel free to make slight alterations to the required words if you want to avoid that eye-pokey repetition you can find in sestinas sometimes.

      Required Words: Free, Rod, Gush, Slice, Cry, Set

      Bonus Exercise: The words perfectly set you up for a piece about someone getting cut, so do that, but also have the piece include one movie character that the narrator imagines seeing at one point. 
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      If you'd like some background music to write to, try In a Tender Mood by Gordon Jenkins.


















      11/5/19

      Fall Writing Exercise Series #66 Title Mania Plus Boom Boom Persimmons 10


      The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

      These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
      #66
      Title Mania Plus Boom Boom Persimmons 10

      For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which uses one of the following as its title. For a bonus challenge use the additional exercise of five random constraints.


      Titles:
      1. Arranging a Row of Ducklings
      2. Weaksauce
      3. Tournament of the Few That Showed Up
      4. Roustabout
      5. Aghast, Staring Down the Stairs

      Bonus Exercise: 5 Random Constraints
      (I recommend picking any required words or lines before writing with a little surplus for options, but with your chosen title in mind)
      1. Your first paragraph must include the description of a sound.
      2. You must include at least six words which begin with the letter combination "Br".
      3. You must include one sentence (or at least 5 consecutive words) from the poem "Persimmons" by Li-Young Lee.
      4. You must include one motor vehicle.
      5. Your piece must include both uses of one of these multi-syllabic homophone.

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      If you'd like some background music to write to, try "Boom Boom & Greatest Hits" by blues legend John Lee Hooker.







      11/4/19

      Fall Writing Exercise Series #65: Beginning & Ending with Bastion 10


      The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

      These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
      #65

      Beginning & Ending with Bastion 10
      For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which begins with one image, scenario, line of dialog or place and ends with another, and an optional additional requirement.



      Begin WithSomething bobbing in a river.

      End Withthe line of dialog "Take the second left and drive until the road ends."


      Extra Credit RequirementsInclude the description of something the color orange; and the words: "Corn" "Tornado" "Stagnant" and "Coil".


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      If you'd like some background music, try the soundtrack to the 2011 RPG game Bastion.




      11/3/19

      Fall Writing Exercise Series #64: 3x5x10+ Wordbank 10


      The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

      These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

      #64
      3x5x10+ Wordbank 10
      For today's writing exercise complete the following steps.

      1) Pick one word from each of three groups and write a sentence that includes all of the words, feel free to change tense, pluralize, gerund etc. 
      2) Repeat the process ten (10) times using different combinations. No dawdling!
      3) Now write five (5) sentences that are five words or fewer in length that use any two (2) words.
      4) Now write three (3) sentences that use four or more of the words.
      5) Now write a piece of fiction or poetry that uses at least three (3) of those sentences. Try to use as many of the (good) sentences as you can, or parts of the sentences if the whole thing doesn't fit or works better altered.


      Word Bank 1:
      • Taurus
      • Fluid
      • Episodic
      • Revenge
      • Spite
      Wordbank 2:
      • Logo
      • Tirade
      • Piston
      • Eccentric
      • Scandal
      Wordbank 3:
      • Hood
      • Piglet
      • Ikea
      • Coffee
      • Tarnish

      Bonus writing exercise: Include in your story or poem someone tearing a piece of paper.
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      Want some unobtrusive background writing music? Try the album Ready for Freddy by jazz trumpeter Freddy Hubbard.















      11/2/19

      Fall Writing Exercise Series #63 Three Things and a Random Title 04


      The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

      These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

      #63
      Three Things and a Random Title 04
      For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which contains the following three things, using a title generated by the random title generator linked below. Nice and simple. If you're not intimately familiar with these things do a little reading and see if a piece of info sticks out.


      Title:
       Use this title generator. Get a look at the 3 things below that you must use and generate phrases 10 at a time. Try the more button on the generator no more than three times. If you click it a third time, that's it. Pick one of those. This is one of the best title generators I've found. "Sophie and the Magpie" is one I got when testing that I may have to try.





      1. A VHS Cassette Tape
      2. Rosemary
      3. An Attic



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      If you'd like some background music to write to, try Minneapolis emcee Brother Ali's brand new album which just dropped today, Secrets & Escapes.



      11/1/19

      Fall Writing Exercise Series #62: Erasing The Crystal Egg 11


      The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

      These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

      #62
      Erasing The Crystal Egg 11

      For today's exercise we have split paths for fiction and poetry, though I highly recommend that even fiction writers try the poetry exercise.

      If you insist on fiction, write a piece titled either "To Attract the Attention of the Martians" "The Most Imposing Pattern" or "Seasonal Labor".

      For poetry do an erasure or black-out poem from the following selection of H.G. Wells' short story "The Crystal Egg". An Erasure/Blackout is really simple: you take the given text and remove many words to make it your own new piece. One way to go about the erasure that I like to do is to copy the text and paste it twice into your document before you start erasing or blacking out (in MS Word set the text background color to black), that way if you get further into the erasure and decide you want a somewhat different tone or direction, it's easy to go to the unaltered version and make the erasure/black-out piece smoother. Another tip is to look for recurring words, in this example Cave and crystal both occur many times and could be good touchstones for your piece.

      Today's excerpt is a little short so keep that in mind\ when composing your erasure.

      Erasure Selection:

      from The Crystal Egg

      After a time Mr. Wace aspired to attract the attention of the Martians, and the next time that the strange eyes of one of them appeared close to the crystal Mr. Cave cried out and sprang away, and they immediately turned on the light and began to gesticulate in a manner suggestive of signalling. But when at last Mr. Cave examined the crystal again the Martian had departed.

      Thus far these observations had progressed in early November, and then Mr. Cave, feeling that the suspicions of his family about the crystal were allayed, began to take it to and fro with him in order that, as occasion arose in the daytime or night, he might comfort himself with what was fast becoming the most real thing in his existence.

      In December Mr. Wace’s work in connection with a forthcoming examination became heavy, the sittings were reluctantly suspended for a week, and for ten or eleven days — he is not quite sure which — he saw nothing of Cave. He then grew anxious to resume these investigations, and, the stress of his seasonal labours being abated, he went down to Seven Dials. At the corner he noticed a shutter before a bird fancier’s window, and then another at a cobbler’s. Mr. Cave’s shop was closed.

      He rapped and the door was opened by the step-son in black. He at once called Mrs. Cave, who was, Mr. Wace could not but observe, in cheap but ample widow’s weeds of the most imposing pattern. Without any very great surprise Mr. Wace learnt that Cave was dead and already buried. She was in tears, and her voice was a little thick. She had just returned from Highgate. Her mind seemed occupied with her own prospects and the honourable details of the obsequies, but Mr. Wace was at last able to learn the particulars of Cave’s death. He had been found dead in his shop in the early morning, the day after his last visit to Mr. Wace, and the crystal had been clasped in his stone-cold hands. His face was smiling, said Mrs. Cave, and the velvet cloth from the minerals lay on the floor at his feet. He must have been dead five or six hours when he was found.

      This came as a great shock to Wace, and he began to reproach himself bitterly for having neglected the plain symptoms of the old man’s ill-health. But his chief thought was of the crystal. He approached that topic in a gingerly manner, because he knew Mrs. Cave’s peculiarities. He was dumfounded to learn that it was sold.

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      If you'd like some background music to write to, try the album Resolver by 90's girl rockers Veruca Salt.