12/7/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #97 Title Mania Plus the Reggae 15


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
#97
Title Mania Plus Reggae 15

For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which uses one of the following as its title. For a bonus challenge use the additional exercise of five random constraints.


Titles:
  1. Pillowcase
  2. Matched Lighting
  3. Useless Lines of Dialog
  4. Darkness Levels
  5. Advanced Compositing

Bonus Exercise: 5 Random Constraints
(I recommend picking any required words or lines before writing with a little surplus for options, but with your chosen title in mind)
  1. Your first paragraph must include a drinking vessel/cup of some sort.
  2. You must include at least six words which begin with the letter combination "Sl".
  3. You must include at least 4 consecutive words from the poem "Yeah, Sure" by Bryce Berkowitz published at Yemassee on November 10th.
  4. You must include the words "Tunnel" "Illusions" "Lens" and "Smash".
  5. Your piece must include an item that is supposed to be circular that has a large dent in it.

------------------------------------

If you'd like some background music to write to, try the reggae album "Hit Me with Music by Sara Lugo.











12/6/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #96 Three Things and a Random Title 09


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#96
Three Things and a Random Title 09
For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which contains the following three things, using a title generated by the random title generator linked below. Nice and simple. If you're not intimately familiar with these things do a little reading and see if a piece of info sticks out.



Title:
 Use this title generator. Get a look at the 3 things below that you must use and generate phrases 6 at a time. Try the more button on the generator no more than three times. If you click it a third time, that's it. Pick one of those. This is one of the better title generators I've found.
  1. A Coffee Cup
  2. A Peregrine Falcon
  3. A Piece of Gum on the Sidewalk

------------------------------------




If you'd like some background music to write to, try this album of acoustic covers by Felix Irwan.








12/5/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #95: Six Word Shootout with Bread Baking 13


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#95
Six Word Shootout with Bread Baking 13

For today's writing exercise write a piece that includes the following six words. While it perfectly sets you up for a sestina, feel free to write whatever you'd like (but ya know, give that sestina a shot!). Also feel free to make slight alterations to the required words if you want to avoid that eye-pokey repetition you can find in sestinas sometimes.

Required Words: Bread, Renew, Rise, Yeast, Steel, Coffee

Bonus Exercise: Include in your piece a the image of the moon shining through fog, and someone singing at least 5 words of a nursery rhyme. 
------------------------------------

If you'd like some background music to write to, try the album "Like I Used To" by British folk singer Lucy Rose.





















12/4/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #94: 3x5x10+ Wordbank 15


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#94
3x5x10+ Wordbank 15
For today's writing exercise complete the following steps.

1) Pick one word from each of three groups and write a sentence that includes all of the words, feel free to change tense, pluralize, gerund etc. 
2) Repeat the process ten (10) times using different combinations. No dawdling!
3) Now write five (5) sentences that are five words or fewer in length that use any two (2) words.
4) Now write three (3) sentences that use four or more of the words.
5) Now write a piece of fiction or poetry that uses at least three (3) of those sentences. Try to use as many of the (good) sentences as you can, or parts of the sentences if the whole thing doesn't fit or works better altered.


Word Bank 1:
  • Proof
  • Wheat
  • Iraq
  • Young
  • Tarot
Wordbank 2:
  • Grew
  • Triad
  • Quake
  • Focus
  • Vex
Wordbank 3:

Bonus writing exercise: Include in your story or poem a sentence which is exactly two words long, and the piece must include the image of an owl in a knothole (place in the trunk where a limb has died or been cut off which rots to produce a hollow in the tree).



------------------------------------



Want some unobtrusive background writing music? Try this remaster of American rock band American Football's eponymous debut album recorded in 1997.

















12/3/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #93: Beginning & Ending with Poker 14


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
#93

Beginning & Ending with Poker 14
For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which begins with one image, scenario, line of dialog or place and ends with another, and an optional additional requirement.


Begin WithSomeone dealing out playing cards.

End WithSomeone poking at the almost-out coals of a fire.


Extra Credit RequirementsInclude the description of a specific type of gun; and the words: "Fractions" "Decay" "Lightness" and "Instability".


------------------------------------

If you'd like some background music, try the Icelandic electronic group GusGus's album "Lies Are More Flexible".








12/2/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #92 Title Mania Plus the Blues 14


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
#92
Title Mania Plus the Blues 14

For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which uses one of the following as its title. For a bonus challenge use the additional exercise of five random constraints.


Titles:
  1. We Win Together
  2. 1000 Lily Pads
  3. "Textures in Pitch Black" and Other Song Titles From His Garage Band
  4. A Jaunty Tune
  5. Farther From the Sun

Bonus Exercise: 5 Random Constraints
(I recommend picking any required words or lines before writing with a little surplus for options, but with your chosen title in mind)
  1. Your first paragraph must include a drinking vessel/cup of some sort.
  2. You must include at least six words which begin with the letter combination "Tr".
  3. You must include at least 4 consecutive words from the poem "Fu er dai" by Stella Wong from the current issue of Poetry Northwest.
  4. You must include the words "Torpedo" "Escalate" "Genre" and "Scraped".
  5. Your piece must include an item with a coating of dust on it.

------------------------------------

If you'd like some background music to write to, try Wynton Marsalis and Eric Clapton Play the Blues.










12/1/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #91 Three Things and a Random Title 08


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#91
Three Things and a Random Title 08
For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which contains the following three things, using a title generated by the random title generator linked below. Nice and simple. If you're not intimately familiar with these things do a little reading and see if a piece of info sticks out.



Title:
 Use this title generator. Get a look at the 3 things below that you must use and generate phrases 6 at a time. Try the more button on the generator no more than three times. If you click it a third time, that's it. Pick one of those. This is one of the better title generators I've found.


  1. Whiskers
  2. Neptune
  3. Tic-Tac-Toe

------------------------------------




If you'd like some background music to write to, try Marcus Warner's album, 39 Seconds.







11/30/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #90: Six Word Shootout with Paint 12


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.


#90
Six Word Shootout with Paint 12

For today's writing exercise write a piece that includes the following six words. While it perfectly sets you up for a sestina, feel free to write whatever you'd like (but ya know, give that sestina a shot!). Also feel free to make slight alterations to the required words if you want to avoid that eye-pokey repetition you can find in sestinas sometimes.

Required Words: Hear, Strip, High, Grain, Late, Call

Bonus Exercise: Include in your piece a paint swatch and someone climbing over a fence with difficulty. 
------------------------------------

If you'd like some background music to write to, try the Bossa Nova album "1981" by Hector Costita.





















11/29/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #89: 3x5x10+ Wordbank 14


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#89
3x5x10+ Wordbank 14
For today's writing exercise complete the following steps.

1) Pick one word from each of three groups and write a sentence that includes all of the words, feel free to change tense, pluralize, gerund etc. 
2) Repeat the process ten (10) times using different combinations. No dawdling!
3) Now write five (5) sentences that are five words or fewer in length that use any two (2) words.
4) Now write three (3) sentences that use four or more of the words.
5) Now write a piece of fiction or poetry that uses at least three (3) of those sentences. Try to use as many of the (good) sentences as you can, or parts of the sentences if the whole thing doesn't fit or works better altered.


Word Bank 1:
  • Elevate
  • Whetstone
  • Cacti
  • Grungy
  • Trawler
Wordbank 2:
  • Squash
  • Plunge
  • Yowled
  • Jig
  • Raft
Wordbank 3:
  • Rug
  • Appreciate
  • Troll
  • Hockey
  • Foul

Bonus writing exercise: Include in your story or poem a sentence which is exactly four words long, the last one being "Help", and must include the image of a lake iced over.
------------------------------------

Want some unobtrusive background writing music? Try Matt Elliott's 2004 album Drinking Songs.
















11/28/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #88: Micro 101 Episode 05 Produce Section


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#88
Micro 101 Episode 05 Produce Section

For today's writing exercise you will write a few micro-poems or micro-fictions. These will be either poems under 12 lines or stories under 100 words.

Don't worry about them not containing a complex message. Aim for a surface level with one metaphoric level. Focus on interesting juxtapositions, something out of place and why—either why it is in that place, why it's out of place or why it actually fits in for some unexpected reason. Real Estate is expensive in a micro so avoid too many phrasal verbs and using too many articles when possible. But also don't expect a micro to explain the world in 100 words.

Here is a good short guide about crafting plot in micro fictions from Mythcreants, which sounds to me like how Mike Tyson would describe the characters in Suicide Squad.

For inspiration go read some micro or hint fiction in this Buzzfeed article, at Microfiction Monday32 Poems and Nanoism.

Micro Exercise Pre-Listing: Make a list of five specific people you wouldn't expect to see in your local grocery store's produce section, five people you might expect to be found there on occasion, and three deceased people you're fascinated with/interested in. Write three words/phrases to describe each person. Make a list of ten items you might expect to find in the produce section, as well as three more exotic items from this list and again for each item list three words or phrases to describe each item (remember to use multiple senses). This list will facilitate the following exercises
Micro Exercise 1: This micro is titled "To Be Expected in Produce" (or "Expected Near the Fruit") and will be a series of three or four 'expected' people and produce items (Person A ponders the necessity for fresh basil as Person B compares the bruises of petite winter avocados.) Finish the piece with a general gesture to the greater world beyond the supermarket which takes a backseat to food/nutrition/eating etc.
Micro Exercise 2: Write a first person micro in which 'you' are grocery shopping while tired and twice you think you see people from your list of deceased list, both times it turns out to be someone ordinary (from your list or not) but then you think you see someone from the 'unexpected' list and check yourself, skeptical, but it really is that person. Be sure to include some of your produce and descriptions.
Micro Exercise 3: Write down 4-7 interesting phrases/titles from this Random Title Generator, use it as many as ten times if you need to. Use one of those as the title and include a second in the micro which also includes at least two of your produce items.
Micro Exercise 4: Write a piece where you imagine one of the people from your deceased list is having difficulties finding something at the grocery story and one of the 'expected' people helps them find the item, not knowing who the person was, include at least two of the deceased person's achievements/accolades etc as things the other person wouldn't know of/care of/understand etc.
------------------------------------

If you'd like some background music to write to, try the Gene Ammons' album "Blue Gene".



11/27/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #87: Beginning & Ending with Dinner 13


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
#87

Beginning & Ending with Dinner 13
For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which begins with one image, scenario, line of dialog or place and ends with another, and an optional additional requirement.


Begin WithWalking into a home to smell dinner being prepared (cooking/baking).

End With: A streetlight flickering and going out.


Extra Credit RequirementsInclude the description of a specific type of gun; and the words: "Trial" "Illumination" "Fritter" and "Hone".


------------------------------------

If you'd like some background music, try the young (36) Italian composer Luca D'Alberto's album "Endless".








11/26/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #86 Title Mania Plus Galapagos 13


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
#86
Title Mania Plus Galapagos 13

For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which uses one of the following as its title. For a bonus challenge use the additional exercise of five random constraints.


Titles:
  1. Jab, Jab, Uppercut
  2. Lost in Thought
  3. Thatch Roofs
  4. The Wonderful World of After-School Specials and PSAs
  5. A Hot Savory Broth

Bonus Exercise: 5 Random Constraints
(I recommend picking any required words or lines before writing with a little surplus for options, but with your chosen title in mind)
  1. Your first paragraph must include the description of a piece of sport's equipment.
  2. You must include at least six words which begin with the letter combination "Sp".
  3. You must include one sentence (or at least 4 consecutive words) from the prose poem "On Water" by Marvin Shackleford from the current issue of Spry Literary Journal.
  4. You must include at least two instances where consecutive words rhyme (the deep sleep, the trunk stunk etc).
  5. Your piece must use some kitchen utensil or other everyday item as (a part of) a metaphor for either time passing, aging, or the naivete of youth.

------------------------------------

If you'd like some background music to write to, try "Three Worlds: Music from Woolf Works" by Max Richter.









11/25/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #85 Three Things and a Random Title 07


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#85
Three Things and a Random Title 07
For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which contains the following three things, using a title generated by the random title generator linked below. Nice and simple. If you're not intimately familiar with these things do a little reading and see if a piece of info sticks out.


Title: Use this title generator. Get a look at the 3 things below that you must use and generate phrases 6 at a time. Try the more button on the generator no more than three times. If you click it a third time, that's it. Pick one of those. This is one of the better title generators I've found. "Dreams of Flying" is one I got which could be about a Christmas picture in which the family sits around the tree doing the 'Home Alone face' for a Polaroid while playing a big game of Spades, and while that's how the family remembers that Christmas eve, the narrator mostly remembers their dream that night, a recurring dream of flying which happens any time they're feeling really happy—as an example.

  1. A Deck of Cards
  2. A Polaroid picture
  3. Home Alone (movie)

------------------------------------




If you'd like some background music to write to, try Lisa Gerrard's album, The Silver Tree.






11/24/19

Fall Writing Exercise Series #84: Leaping Repetition


The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#84
Leaping Repetition

For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which contains the following phrase at least four times (non-sequentially):

"Right, left, leap."

    There are many reasons to take a running leap, whether for some athletic endeavor, a quick escape, a fast departure, or a dozen other things. Maybe it's just the way to cross a stream with a reluctant jumper. Or do something completely different. Just be sure that the repeated phrase earns its worth in your piece. It should be necessary.

    Bonus Exercise: Also include the description of some sort of foliage (bushes, leaves etc), and include the words "Tepid" "Generic" "Founder" and "Jaunty".
    ------------------------------------

    If you'd like some background music to write to, try indie hip hop producer Flying Lotus's album Flamagra.

















    11/23/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #83: Six Word Shootout While Jogging 11


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

    #83
    Six Word Shootout While Jogging 11

    For today's writing exercise write a piece that includes the following six words. While it perfectly sets you up for a sestina, feel free to write whatever you'd like (but ya know, give that sestina a shot!). Also feel free to make slight alterations to the required words if you want to avoid that eye-pokey repetition you can find in sestinas sometimes.

    Required Words: New, Run, Letters, Breath, Tape, Drink

    Bonus Exercise: Include in your piece a section in which two people have a clipped conversation/dialog exchange while jogging. 
    ------------------------------------

    If you'd like some background music to write to, try this "Best of" mix of jazz pianist Art Tatum's records.



















    11/22/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #82: 3x5x10+ Wordbank 13


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

    #82
    3x5x10+ Wordbank 13
    For today's writing exercise complete the following steps.

    1) Pick one word from each of three groups and write a sentence that includes all of the words, feel free to change tense, pluralize, gerund etc. 
    2) Repeat the process ten (10) times using different combinations. No dawdling!
    3) Now write five (5) sentences that are five words or fewer in length that use any two (2) words.
    4) Now write three (3) sentences that use four or more of the words.
    5) Now write a piece of fiction or poetry that uses at least three (3) of those sentences. Try to use as many of the (good) sentences as you can, or parts of the sentences if the whole thing doesn't fit or works better altered.


    Word Bank 1:
    • Yellowed
    • Wary
    • Rotten
    • Limp
    • Dingo
    Wordbank 2:
    • Elephant
    • Kid
    • Flit
    • Err
    • Drawstring
    Wordbank 3:
    • Oak
    • Pit
    • Wrongly
    • Elsewhere
    • Lockstep

    Bonus writing exercise: Include in your story or poem a sentence which begins with the letter A and ends with the word "Topaz", and must mention some sort of drink by specific brand or type of drink.
    ------------------------------------

    Want some unobtrusive background writing music? Try Terry Riley's minimalist 1982 album Descending Moonshine Dervishes.















    11/21/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #81: Ekphrastic Forest


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

    #81
    Ekphrastic Forest


    F
    or today, we're going to write a poem or prose piece inspired by another piece of art or an ekphrastic piece. The piece of art in question is this photo by Reddit user  MuonicDecay


    If nothing right off strikes you try the following exercises along with the image.
    1. Tell the story of the planting of this forest from the perspective of a teacher chaperone. At some point envision this image, but also having their hands full trying to keep the rambunctious kids in line.
    2. Write a narrative from the perspective of one of the tree planting fifth grade class of 1994 about returning to this forest as an adult. Do you walk through it, or is the change too much, resulting in 'you' only getting to the parking lot then leaving.
    3. Write a piece in which this picture is taken shortly before a forest fire, and ruminate on the destruction of that forest and the passing of time transmogrifying the children into adults.
    4. Write a piece in which a child runs by this sign into the forest for some reason—whether chased, exploring, playing a game, whatever you want. But he runs by the sign and catches a glimpse of it.

    ---

    If you'd like background writing music try the album Love for Chet by Stéphane Belmondo.






    11/20/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #80: Beginning & Ending with Falling Snow 12


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
    #80

    Beginning & Ending with Falling Snow 12
    For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which begins with one image, scenario, line of dialog or place and ends with another, and an optional additional requirement.


    Begin WithA snowball breaking a window.

    End WithA Christmas wreath covered in snow.


    Extra Credit RequirementsInclude the description of something that squeaks; and the words: "Nutmeg" "Hearth" "Gouge" and "Plasma".


    ------------------------------------

    If you'd like some background music, try Stravinsky's "The Firebird" as performed by the Vienna Philharmonic.






    11/19/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #79 Title Mania Plus Galapagos 12


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
    #79
    Title Mania Plus Galapagos 12

    For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which uses one of the following as its title. For a bonus challenge use the additional exercise of five random constraints.


    Titles:
    1. Bits of Plant Particulate
    2. Mulch
    3. Diving the Dumpsters
    4. Tickled to Death
    5. Under a Classic Car in Santa Clara as the Sun Sets Behind an Iced Tea Slowly Dripping Condensation

    Bonus Exercise: 5 Random Constraints
    (I recommend picking any required words or lines before writing with a little surplus for options, but with your chosen title in mind)
    1. Your first paragraph must include the description of a car part using a simile.
    2. You must include at least six words which begin with the letter combination "Br".
    3. You must include one sentence (or at least 4 consecutive words) from the lyrics to the song "Galapagos (For the Fish)" by Ceschi Ramos.
    4. You must include two pairs of homophones in the same paragraph (4 words).
    5. Your piece must include two foods, one that is served cold and one that is served hot.

    ------------------------------------

    If you'd like some background music to write to, try "Valtari" by Sigur Rós.








    11/18/19

    Fall Writing Exercise Series #78 Three Things and a Random Title 06


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

    #78
    Three Things and a Random Title 06
    For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which contains the following three things, using a title generated by the random title generator linked below. Nice and simple. If you're not intimately familiar with these things do a little reading and see if a piece of info sticks out.



    Title:
     Use this title generator. Get a look at the 3 things below that you must use and generate phrases 10 at a time. Try the more button on the generator no more than three times. If you click it a third time, that's it. Pick one of those. This is one of the best title generators I've found. "Sudden Exit" is one I got which could be about Indiana Jones Jr. stealing a relic from a high security skyscraper being related to a toddler's heist of a strawberry from the countertop—as an example.

    1. Indiana Jones
    2. A Strawberry
    3. Taipei 101 



    ------------------------------------




    If you'd like some background music to write to, try Thievery Corporation's album, Saudade.






    Fall Writing Exercise Series #77: Running Repetition


    The Notebooking Daily Fall Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

    These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

    #77
    Running Repetition

    For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which contains the following phrase at least four times (non-sequentially):

    "Run for your life."

      This could be a very serious, literal running for your life, it could be the exact opposite where the phrase is hyperbolic and there is no danger at all. Maybe it's a command that the narrator gives to animals he's hunting or NPCs in a video game. Maybe it's a meditation on the Boston Marathon bombing (if so, do it in good taste, or, I'd advise that at least). Or do something completely different. Just be sure that the repeated phrase earns its worth in your piece. It should be necessary.

      Bonus Exercise: Also include Someone with a _____ the _____ nickname with the second part being an animal (like, Nicky the Bull, Stan the Snake etc), and include the words "Tape" "Frigid" "Tender" and "Pillar".
      ------------------------------------

      If you'd like some background music to write to, try indie hip hop producer RJD2's album More Is Than Isn't.