8/3/20

2020 Writing Exercise Series #215: 3x5x7 Wordbank Sprints 30


The Notebooking Daily 2020 Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
#215
3x5x7 Wordbank Sprints 30
For today's writing exercise complete the following steps. The wordbank exercise has changed so be sure to take a peek at the new 'rules'. I recommend using the timer on your phone or computer and setting it for 1 minute. Each time you write a sentence, quickly reset the timer. If it goes off before you're finished with the sentence—wrap it up ASAP!

In order to complete the large number of sentences demanded of this exercise it is imperative that you write fast. Don't think too much at all until you've reached the final exercise. The process of this quick production is to thrust past second guesses or other stumbling blocks that sometimes impede your writing. You're aiming to write 23 sentences in at most 20 minutes so you have ten minutes to organize and write that actual piece, so you're going to be writing more than a sentence a minute.

WRITE FAST, DON'T OVERTHINK


  1. Pick one word from each of three groups and write a sentence that includes all of the words, feel free to change tense, pluralize, gerund etc. Repeat the process five (5) times using different combinations. No dawdling! 
  2. Now write three (3) sentences that are six (6) words or fewer in length that use any two (2) words from the wordbanks.
  3. Now write three (3) sentences that use four (4) or more of the words.
  4. Now write five (5) sentences which begin with one (1) of the words and contain a second one (1) of the words.
  5. Now write five (5) sentences which are fewer than ten (10) words in length and conclude with one (1) of the words from the wordbanks. Remember, keep up the pace! Don't overthink!
  6. Now rephrase two (2) of your sentences from exercise #1 in either a more efficient or more descriptive manner.
  7. Now write a piece of fiction or poetry that uses at least three (3) of the sentences you've written throughout this process of exercises. Try to use as many of the (good) sentences as you can, or parts of the sentences if the whole thing doesn't fit or works better altered.
Word Bank 1:
  • Triad
  • Plunked
  • Ruffled
  • Crab
  • Chameleon
Wordbank 2:
  • Hind
  • Startled
  • Delayed
  • Sear
  • Quarry

Wordbank 3
:
  • Yam
  • Turnip
  • Roast
  • Elongated
  • Polar

Bonus writing exercise: Include the word "Grown" in your title, and in the piece you must include a puddle or pool of liquid.

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Want some unobtrusive background writing music try Goldberg Variations Complete (J.S. Bach BWV 988), with score, Kimiko Ishizaka .

2020 Writing Exercise Series #214: Title Mania Plus 34


The Notebooking Daily 2020 Writing Series is here! These are daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
#214
Title Mania Plus 34

For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which uses one of the following as its title. Before you write, first read the poem from which the titles are selected. For a bonus challenge use the additional exercise of five random constraints.

Today's titles come from Zoey Pincelli's poem "Glass by the River" from Whiskey Island Online (April 19, 2019). Go read it!

Titles:
  1. With Scraped Knees
  2. Thin, Curved Emeralds 
  3. Pill Bugs
  4. Running Wild Through the Scraping Branches
  5. Shoelace. Applesauce.
  6. Mourning Something Your Mind Has Forgotten

Bonus Exercise: Three Things
(Your piece must also include the following three 'things')
  1. Thor
  2. A Dandelion
  3. A Water Balloon
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If you'd like some background music to write to, try this "Trip Into Space" lofi mix from our YouTube friend Dreamy.

8/2/20

2020 Writing Exercise Series #213: Beginning & Ending with Bricks 24


The Notebooking Daily 2020 Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.

These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.
#213
Beginning & Ending with Bricks 24

F
or today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which begins with one image, scenario, line of dialog or place and ends with another, and an optional additional requirement.

Begin WithA brick being thrown through a window.

End With: The image of flowering ivy on a brick wall.

Extra Credit RequirementsInclude, somewhere in the first two paragraphs/stanzas, the phrase "Folded Airplanes"; and somewhere in your piece include the words: "Garnered" "Safe" "Darted" "Jocular" and "Ploy".
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If you'd like some unobtrusive background music try Billy Taylor - "With Four Flutes"

8/1/20

2020 Writing Exercise Series #212 Say Anaphora—Repetition Files 11


The Notebooking Daily 2020 Writing Series is a daily writing exercises for both prose writers and poets to keep your creative mind stretched and ready to go—fresh for your other writing endeavors. The writing prompts take the impetus—that initial crystal of creation—out of your hands (for the most part) and changes your writing creation into creative problem solving. Instead of being preoccupied with the question "What do I write" you are instead pondering "How do I make this work?" And in the process you are producing new writing.


These exercises are not meant to be a standard writing session. They are meant to be productive and to keep your brain thinking about using language to solve simple or complex problems. The worst thing you can do is sit there inactive. It's like taking a 5 minute breather in the middle of a spin class—the point is to push, to produce something, however imperfect. If you don't overthink them, you will be able to complete all of the exercises in under 30 minutes.

#212
Say Anaphora—Repetition Files 11

For today's writing exercise you will write a piece of poetry or prose which focuses on repetition. In this instance we will work with anaphora. It's a handy little bit of poetic craft that goes a little something like this:

the repetition of a word or words at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, or lines to create a sonic effect.
Take a moment and read the above-linked Poetry Foundation article, even if you know the term. For even more fun check out this longer article called Adventures in Anaphora.

Your mission is to use the following phrase to begin at least 5 sentences.

The word or phrase we'll use for our exercise today is:

"Say"

    I was inspired to choose "Say" because of recently re-reading Ada Limón's wonderful poem "The Conditional". There are a number of ways you could approach this bit of anaphora. Just be sure that the repeated phrase earns its worth in your piece. It should be necessary. Also be sure to follow Limón's lead and enjamb some lines so that the "Say" isn't exclusively at the beginning of the line. 

    Bonus Exercise: Include these five words into your piece "Deferred" "Fungi" "Idol" "Donkey" and "Junk".
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    If you'd like some background music to write to, try "Chopin - Nocturne Op. 9 No. 2" (60 minute version) with rain sounds.